Publications & Team

Current Research

Bina is currently working on Taking Stock of Organised Crime, a project funded by The Dawes Trust exploring the nature of organised crime groups involved in fraud in the UK. She is also working on an inter-disciplinary European study - City.Risks: Avoiding and mitigating safety risks in urban environments (http://www.cityrisks.eu/). The aim of the project is to increase the perception of security amongst citizens who live and/or work in the city through the use of smart phone technology. She is also working on ICPR's evaluation of the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction hosted by The College of Policing.

Background and Expertise

Bina re-joined ICPR in October 2013 as a research assistant on a project exploring the nature and diversity of organised crime groups involved in fraud in the UK. She first joined ICPR in 2008, having completed an MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice at King's College London. Her MA dissertation looked at the lenient policing of cannabis and the impact of discretionary practice on young people. She has a BA in Sociology from Royal Holloway, University of London.

During her time at ICPR, Bina worked on all stages of a study funded by the Prison Reform Trust looking at the profile of children in custody - 'Punishing Disadvantage'. Other projects included a study exploring the impact and delivery of alcohol treatment requirements, offender management in the Probation Service and differential treatment in the youth justice system.

Bina completed her PhD in December 2014 in Sociology from Lancaster University. Her research looked at legal and illegal drug use, the use of digital technologies and policing in three dance settings. Whilst at Lancaster University, Bina worked on a cross-disciplinary EPSRC-funded project called 'You Design It', which explored how social media tools, such as smart phones can be used to engage different social groups in tackling anti-social behaviour. She also assisted with conducting surveys in the night-time economy for a project funded by Lancashire Drug and Alcohol Team (LDAAT). In addition, Bina taught on the undergraduate Criminology module, 'Drugs, Crime and Society'.

Her research interests include: changing drug use patterns and markets, drug policy, organised crime, young people and cultural criminology.

Bina is currently teaching on the Drugs, Crime and Criminal Justice module on the BSc Criminology and Criminal Justice module at Birkbeck, University of London.

Publications

An Evaluation of the ‘What Works Centre for Crime Reduction’ Year 2: Progress

  • Author(s) Gillian Hunter, Alexandra Wigzell, Bina Bhardwa, Tiggey May and Mike Hough
  • SubjectCriminal justice agencies and services
  • Year2016
  • LocationLondon
  • Publisher/PublicationICPR
  • DownloadsICPR_Evaluation_ of_WWCCR_ Yr_2 2016

Markets and Distribution Systems: The Birth, Growth and Transformation of UK Drug Markets

  • Author(s) Tiggey May and Bina Bhardwa
  • SubjectDrugs, alcohol and crime
  • Year2015
  • LocationHoboken, New Jersey
  • Publisher/PublicationWiley Blackwell
  • Misc infoin H.H. Brownstein (ed) Handbook on Drugs and Society

There to Help: Ensuring provision of appropriate adults for mentally vulnerable adults detained or interviewed by police

  • Author(s) Chris Bath with Bina Bhardwa, Jessica Jacobson, Tiggey May and Russel Webster
  • SubjectCriminal justice agencies and services
  • Year2015
  • LocationLondon
  • Publisher/PublicationNational Appropriate Adult Network
  • Downloads2015_theretohelp

Engaging substance misusing offenders: A rapid review of the substance misuse treatment literature

The impact and delivery of alcohol treatment requirements

  • Author(s) McSweeney, T. and Bhardwa, B.
  • SubjectDrugs, alcohol and crime
  • Year2011
  • LocationLondon
  • Publisher/PublicationICPR
  • Misc infoStudy conducted in the Leicestershire and Rutland Probation Trust area
  • DownloadsLRPT ATR summary.pdf

Punishing Disadvantage: A profile of children in custody

Differential treatment in the youth justice system

The transitional experience of prisoners with alcohol problems